Lebanon Preparing For A Nuclear Plant

Lebanon is on track for nuclear energy! Who knew it was even in the works?

According to Al-Nahar, prime minister Najib Mikati met with people from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and some Lebanese scientists to discuss the possibility of building a nuclear plant in Lebanon. The prime minister was welcoming to the idea and asked for the study regarding the project to be done in six months.

While we won’t be the first country in the region to have such a plant, I see this as a very advanced step that might be premature with the current state of our infrastructure: ranging from our internet to our roads. When the government is fighting over electricity boats & new power plants, and when there are talks about cost-cutting with regards to rebuilding certain bridges (Jal El Dib to be exact), somehow a nuclear plant is way over the top, no?

This doesn’t mean a plant will surely be built. God knows such “studies” tend to be dragged on and on until the whole affair becomes history and the people get over their enthusiasm. And to be honest, is Lebanon ready – politically – for all the repercussions that having nuclear energy entails?

We are too worried to take a clear stance regarding Syria – how about when the whole world looks upon this little country – with the  “terrorist” group Hezbollah – procuring nuclear energy?

9 thoughts on “Lebanon Preparing For A Nuclear Plant

  1. I personally don’t think that this step is premature, energy is the most basic infrastructure that drives anything you name in a country, that’s why it’s a main element of the national security of any respectful country. Not to mention that in fact most of our financial woes are coming from financing the gold sucking whirlpool called Kahrabaa Loubnan. If this money can be saved, it’ll make a big difference in improving all other types of infrastructure.

    A nuclear plant will put us away from the fossil fuel oil prices’ volatility and will offer a stable and cheaper alternative, however, as you said with that much of political instability and with the lebanese state acting as an “extra actor” in what’s happening in Lebanon, I believe it’s going to be very hard to get such a technology. Unless special arrangements for fuel transfer and monitoring can be negotiated maybe? Let’s see how far this will go and I really hope it’ll lead somewhere.

    Reply
  2. I personally don’t think that this step is premature, energy is the most basic infrastructure that drives anything you name in a country, that’s why it’s a main element of the national security of any respectful country. Not to mention that in fact most of our financial woes are coming from financing the gold sucking whirlpool called Kahrabaa Loubnan. If this money can be saved, it’ll make a big difference in improving all other types of infrastructure.

    A nuclear plant will put us away from the fossil fuel oil prices’ volatility and will offer a stable and cheaper alternative, however, as you said with that much of political instability and with the lebanese state acting as an “extra actor” in what’s happening in Lebanon, I believe it’s going to be very hard to get such a technology. Unless special arrangements for fuel transfer and monitoring can be negotiated maybe? Let’s see how far this will go and I really hope it’ll lead somewhere..

    Reply
    • Most of our financial woes from EDL is from the fact that many people don’t pay their bills. Add to it the dismal state of the plants. I don’t see more people paying if we bring in nuclear power plants.

      With the discovery of oil in Lebanon, perhaps fossil fuel is the cheaper way to go (at least for now) until we have enough money to invest in better alternatives.
      But I think, as I’ve mentioned and you agreed, that the political situation will not help.

      Reply
      • Sorry for the double posts, wordpress gave me an error for the 1st one then later decided to show it. Anyway, the big deficit in EDL’s balance sheet is not mainly due to uncollected bills but mostly from selling a KWh way cheaper than it costs at prices that were fixed when the oil barrel was hovering around $18/$20. To have a feel for it compare what you pay for your generator to what you pay to EDL it’s 2-3 times more(maybe 4 times more) for almost half the amount of power. Not to mention that around 30%(estimated number) of the produced power is wasted through inefficiency and bad engineering on the transmission and distribution networks.

        If EDL plans to make profits or just break-even, the price of its KWh has to climb close to that of what generators make us pay, and that’s why relying on fossil fuel is a big danger, you’re left at the mercy of the price of the oil barrel which will be climbing from now on.

        The problem of areas who are not paying is a standalone problem to deal with regardless of how your produce power, it’ll be there no matter how you produce power, but if you have a power source that can provide energy with a stable and cheaper price, chances that people will pay are higher than when you have a tariff climbing up according to the climbing price of the oil barrel. That’s why nuclear can be a cheaper alternative and that’s the important point here, reliance on fossil fuel plants as a sole source of power is simply ridiculous, at least we should add nuclear or renewable sources to diversify sources of production and alleviate exposure to oil prices volatility.

        Now when it comes to oil in Lebanon, we need it for other things, with the oil prices going up if we can manage to satisfy the internal needs and export a bit it’ll be better than stupidly burning it in fossil fuel power plants while we can have other options that can help us save money, export oil and make profits out of it.

        Reply
        • Agreed. But EDL was losing even when fuel prices were around $20 a barrel. I wouldn’t mind paying more for electricity as long as I don’t have to pay that same amount twice. But when it comes to the nuclear plant, I’m not against it in principle. I mean, why not?
          But there are way too many things that need to be fixed before we have it. If having proper electricity means waiting until a nuclear plant is built, ya3tik l 3afie.
          The problem with areas will remain. But I think when the state becomes rich enough, due to oil, it will be able to enforce regulations more. Or at least I hope so.
          And when it comes to the oil, the quantities discovered off our shores are said to be of a huge magnitude. So I think we’ll have plenty to build a great economy and get electricity, eventually reaching a state that can build a nuclear plant without us discussing whether there are “better” things to spend money on.

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