Lebanon Protests: The Need For Change Doesn’t End With Hariri Resigning

Via Art Of Thawra

It took 13 days of the entire country being paralyzed for Lebanon’s politician to budge. In a statement in which he decried that “no one is above their country,” Saad Hariri – our now (former?) prime minister issued his resignation.

His resignation comes today to the background of plenty of Hezbollah and Amal thugs storming the downtown Beirut area, beating up protesters, women, reports, breaking down equipment, and the tents those protesters were using to demand basic human rights.

If anything, Hariri’s resignation can’t be more timely: he is resigning from leading a country he was not able to govern, as exemplified by our own security forces standing helpless as those goons came down on peaceful protests, bolstered by their impenetrable political shield.

But let’s not forget that this isn’t just about Hariri, or Bassil, or Aoun, or Berri, or any other politician who hasn’t been at the forefront of the protest chants. Kellon ye3ne Kellon means that Hariri’s resignation should be one of many, and it should be a wake up call for us that building the country we deserve doesn’t stop when someone resigns.

In 2005, the massive protests after the assassination of Rafic Hariri led to the resignation of the prime minister. A lot of people were satisfied with that development, and it was surely triumphant. But as the subsequent decade has shown us, it was not enough.

Hariri resigning is not enough.

Our politicians are symptoms of a syndrome. This syndrome is the sectarian rule of law that has enabled them to persist as parasites, leeching off the people from whom they’ve sucked all the will to survive.

It is not a surprise that, nowadays, criticizing Hariri – to many – feels as if you’re criticizing Sunnis. It is not a surprise that many think criticizing Hezbollah and Amal is akin to criticizing the foundation of Lebanese Shiism. It not a surprise that criticizing Aoun or Bassil or Geagea feels to a lot of people as if you’re attacking Lebanese Christianity.

This is because those politicians have been able to use our sectarian divides as walls that they’ve erected around their halos, in order to perpetuate the illusion of their sanctity, in order to let us think they are untouchable.

The mere notion of some politicians being red lines that should not be crossed in this country, or in any democracy, is a no-go. They should all be open for criticism, impeachment and – most importantly – removal from office.

But that will never happen if we continue to prioritize sect over country. If me, a Lebanese Maronite, will forever be clinging to my Maronitism as the scope with which I view my citizenry, then Lebanon will never be able to become a country that can inhabit all of its people. The same thing applies for people of other sects.

This means that moving forward, Hariri’s resignation is not enough to instill the change we need. Gebran Bassil becoming a “former” minister is not enough, despite how catchy his chants can be. Moving forward, cute chants of “mabsoutaaa3” are not enough to move this country forward.

What we need is a drastic overhaul of the Lebanese system that enables its citizens to be equal in the eye of a common law, not by the law of their respective sects. What we need is a for an electoral law that is not tailored to our current politicians or people who are like them, to enable different faces with the same bullshit to be brought back to office.

What we need is to start concrete steps towards the de-sectarianization of this country so that – in 10, 20 or 30 years from now – we can get to a place where a Lebanese citizen would not introduce themselves by how they pray.

Until then, I congratulate all of the protestors on this first much-needed ounce of change, and hopefully it is the bellwether of more change to come.

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4 thoughts on “Lebanon Protests: The Need For Change Doesn’t End With Hariri Resigning

  1. The Lebanese constitution is clear: We can ask for the resignation of the government, which already has happened, but we can’t ask for the Neanderthal Berri or the overly medicated Aoun to go.

    According to our constitution, the newly formed government would call for new parliamentary elections, after which a new president is elected. But in the meantime, we need both of these old men as figure heads.

    I think we should follow the constitution in pursuing our demands for reforms, and allow the new, independent technocratic government take care of the people’s business. That would lessen the possibility of turmoil.

    As for the obstructing Hezbollah, which has the power to derail everything, that’s for another tangled discussion.

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  2. The Lebanese constitution is clear: We can ask for the resignation of the government, which already has happened, but we can’t ask for the Neanderthal Berri or the overly medicated Aoun to go.

    According to our constitution, the newly formed government would call for new parliamentary elections, after which a new president is elected. But in the meantime, we need both of these old men as figureheads.

    I think we should follow the constitution in pursuing our demands for reforms, and allow the new, independent technocratic government take care of the people’s business. That would lessen the possibility of turmoil.

    As for the obstructing Hezbollah, which has the power to derail everything, that’s for another tangled discussion.

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    Reply
  3. Pingback: Lebanon Protests: The Need For Change Doesn’t End With Hariri Resigning | Ned Hamson's Second Line View of the News

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