Lebanese Girls: Your Guide To Look Like Sluts, BeirutNightLife’s Newest Masterpiece

No, these are not sluts.

After a horrendous piece on transsexualism in Lebanon, BeirutNightLife is at it again. This time, the article is about Lebanese girls who like to dress like “hoes.” The article’s title: La Wlooo!!!…How to Look like a Lebanese Bimbo.

After being attacked countless times for making fun of Lebanese girls who love looking like hoes, I figured ho-defenders out there are too many to be conquered by merely one loser such as myself — but I’ll keep writing about these divine creatures, who I’m so envious of, because I’m so ugly and miserable. So many of my intelligent ho-loving readers, who love me so much, accuse me of being fat, ugly, unbearable, miserable, bitter and single; they have truly exposed me for who I truly am. After weeping on my bathroom floor for weeks, I decided to emerge from my funk as an enlightened one that has come to terms with one truth: I am ugly, and prostitutes are ravishing; hence, I am jealous of them and want to look exactly like them, which is the only logical reason as to why I make fun of them.

If you’re ugly like me, you’ll need to start looking like a ho asap so you can find a gentleman who will appreciate your personality and want to marry you and have your babies one day.

 This is the article’s introduction. After your outrage at this has subsided, let’s go through it bit by bit.

1) The article’s writer is basically calling every Lebanese girl that shows cleavage a prostitute. There’s no other way around this. And if this wasn’t her intention, then her phrasing was so bad that it can only be interpreted as such.

2) I don’t really care about what people told the article’s writer regarding her previous chef-d’oeuvre. I have been attacked multiple times on various blog posts here and you don’t see me coming off as bitter about it, nor do I go on writing sarcastic pieces about how they are in the wrong and I am in the right. Why? Because when you’re discussing such a topic, you don’t really get the right to be the scorned woman when you’re calling every single woman out there who doesn’t dress like you a slut and those who like such women “ho-lovers.”

3) Defending a woman’s right to dress the way she wants does not make one a ho-lover. It doesn’t make the woman a hoe. In fact, using the words hoe, ho-loving and bimbo is an insult. I’m writing this from class today. The girl sitting in front of me is sporting a mini-skirt. Do I naturally assume she’s a slut and because I like what she’s wearing, I’m a ho-lover? So much wrong.

Let’s proceed with the amazingly detailed and researched article.

The writer wants Lebanese women who are haters of the “hoes” to admit the truth that they are really jealous and that their aim in life should switch from becoming lawyers and doctors and dress up like sluts just to get a man of quality. “Real beauty is looking like a $2 h**ker,” she says.

Furthermore, the writer then gives a guideline for women to dress like hoes: show everything you can, even your private parts, while standing on hooker heels. She also gives them a dress code for daytime where they need to put on copious amounts of perfumes and “stick to scents that will make you smell like a baby wh**e.”

She then proceeds to tell the women that “when you go out dancing, make sure to rub your butt on every strange man standing nearby. As you do this, touch yourself while chewing gum and sucking your finger simultaneously. Once again, if you’re wearing those feminine h**ker heels, the stranger you’re rubbing up against will marry you within weeks.”

And after various other meaningless paragraphs, she concludes by saying:  “The awkward moment when your sarcasm is so advanced that people actually think you are stupid.”

No, you don’t get to write such an article and then call it sarcasm to escape the anger of those who don’t “understand” it. And for the record, your sarcasm is not advanced. It’s way out of place. How about you dress the way you want and leave your nose out of other people’s business or cleavage for that matter? This is a free country. The only reason the article writer is up in a fit is because of the stereotypes that such women generate towards other Lebanese women. But the fact is that if this writer had been in any other country, she wouldn’t have cared. And the only reason she cares is because repressed arabs look at Lebanon as a sex paradise.

Should we care about what they think? No. Should we really be up in a fit about the way some of our women dress? No. Is it your business to begin with? Absolutely not.

If there’s anything that needs to change in this country is narrow-minded people who can’t but gossip “sarcastically” in order to prove a point. Calling people names is not the way you change things. You need to take a look at the file names for the attachments on the article: Dominique Hourani is called a Lebanese prostitute and Marwa is called a Lebanese whore. Is that sarcastic too?

16 thoughts on “Lebanese Girls: Your Guide To Look Like Sluts, BeirutNightLife’s Newest Masterpiece

  1. The following words are not my own but nevertheless relevant when we are dealing with what is “appropriate”, and especially with people who want to ban whatever they dislike:

    “Policing nudity encourages a perverse relationship to the body, self and sexuality. Those who advocate censorship of the naked body, even in its most innocent forms such a breastfeeding or tasteful depictions of the body, should question the origin of their impulse to censor. Do they feel they have to take the world to task for urges they cannot reconcile within themselves?”

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    • Well said.
      With Lebanon, however, many feel that such depictions of Lebanese women warrant certain stereotypes from Arabs. Some feel that we need to change those. Others just want things to be.
      I don’t think Arabs are a benchmark for us to compare to, especially their backward countries. But it’s just me, I guess.

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      • To my best knowledge Minoan women did not cover their breasts. If bronze age people without internet and iPads got away with it, this says a lot about people who want to tell other people how to dress in 2012! What we do and do not find acceptable obviously related to our cultural perception, so I understand why the Arabs don’t generally like miniskirts (generalizing here for the sake of argument). On the other hand, I personally believe cultural sensitivities should not always triumph above individual choices.

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        • There are much more examples about things that were allowed back then and are frowned upon today. THere are cultures around the world where things we’d frown upon today are still permitted. I wouldn’t label something as “right” or “wrong” just because it doesn’t fit with my preconceptions.

          And when it comes to this matter, and the Lebanon vs Arabs constant dilemman, I think our culture is much different from theirs because of our individual choices. So asking us to limit those choices in order to conform with their ideology is not acceptable.

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      • u know fares! not all the guys think like u!infortunatelly! i was and old 4 cats member and i ran away from the vulgarety of people they r surrounded by! but ironicly u always see the decent girls miserable and unlucky and the happy and making money ‘be medre aya taree2a’….but i don t have breast job,cleavage is not my thing! and i just got mad to my boyfriend adding these girls!but i will stay myself…..and i think u have good and decsent ethic,stay how u r,u r on the right track,and i think that u r not ugly neither jealous….

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        • Rana, I think the most important thing is to feel comfortable in your own skin. People need to know that just because others dress or act differently doesn’t mean they are such and such. That’s the most important thing and that’s what the writer of the BeirutNightLife article fails to grasp.

          People throw vulgarities all the time. You can either tell them off if you’re bothered or not reply if you really don’t care. Haters are gonna hate.

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  2. it’s really great to see that women are still successfully undermining each other by writing about stupid shit like this that focuses on their appearance and not about, you know, something that actually matters.

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  3. i dont think this article is simply focusing on appearance and its not bashing free will or choice at all. Is the article critical? yes. Is it reflecting an aspect of our society? yes. Does the writer have the right to such an opinion? not only does the writer have the right but its also his/her duty to write such articles. Simply, if you dont like something about your society, then by all means speak out against it and maybe things will change. the writer did not so anything wrong, he/she wrote a satirical piece(not unheard of) and expressed a valid opinion about these women who act(notice i said act…not just look) in such vulgar way.

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    • The author is calling the women who act in a “vulgar” way according to her hoes and sluts. That’s not expressing an opinion, that’s insulting.
      There’s a drastic difference between writing a satirical piece and being flagrantly impolite. She was the latter while trying to do the former.
      I’m sorry but there’s no way saying the words hoes, hooker, sluts and bimbo 500 times is satirical.
      And let’s not talk about the names of those files in her “article.”

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  4. Like all other animals, humans’ primary drive is to attract robust members of the opposite sex and then procreate. To that end human females are programmed to display their physical assets in a way that out-competes others. Lebanese women happen to be particularly competitive in this capacity. Social behaviour modifications that have blunted this natural drive in other female types (e.g., short hair and shapeless dark suits worn by the likes of female employees of public service organizations in North America) have for the most part failed to take hold among women in many Mediterranean countries, including Lebanon.

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  5. Hi Elie, I’ve been following your blog for a few days but I actually came across this post while googling articles related to Lebanese Girls because I wanted to find at least one article that had something positive to say… I’m glad I found this post because although you’re not really discussing the positive stuff, at least you’re defending Lebanese girls and asking people to stop judging and to stop putting a negative label on Lebanese girls… So, thank you! I also tried to share with people that there is a lot more to us than the negative labels, so if you’re interested, pass by my blog and read my Tribute to Lebanese Girls…

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  6. I agree with the author of this article. After spending many many Years in the states, I am shocked at the lack of ethics and the absence of a dress code in Lebanon. Silly lebanese women who obviously wear $5 t-shirts and $10 shoes, always criticize my high end dresses as being too conservative and way too classy for them. Not to mention that I have very thick hair that I don’t die obviously, and which made ignorant and insecure Europeans claim that it is how the hair of “arabian women” is!? Basically, girls here bug me to change it to become as cheap as them, I.e. having straight multi colored lifeless hair, with of course tons of make up and shitty high heel shoes, with all the bad breath that comes from their mouth.

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