Lebanon’s Twisted Perception of Beauty

When a journalist wrote an article in the Huffington Post about Lebanon’s babes and botox in its capital, many Lebanese stood against the article in uproar.

This is not us. These are not our women. This is not our city.

Do they have a point? Sure they do. After all, not all our women boast plastic faces as they strut their heels and behinds on the tables of Beirut’s rooftops. But what people seem to fail to realize is that the side of Lebanon portrayed by the Huffington Post is the one we want to get across to the world.

Check out this video from 2011. I have written about it before (check it here).

I disagree with the content of the video. I dislike the categorization of Lebanese joie de vivre as something only related to partying the night away. But when the only face even your ministry of tourism is giving of your country is that of rooftops, nightclubs and night life, what could you expect from a journalist who’s coming to your country to see the supposed highlights your country has to offer?

When you tell someone to come visit specific places in a country and they judge a country based on the places you recommended, you can’t but blame yourself for that.

Even I am guilty of that. Whenever a French person decides to inform me he thinks my country is full of Islamists where women are forced to wear the veil in order to go out of their homes, I go on and on about our nightlife, among other things. And I’m not even a fan of nightlife to begin with.

What David Constable has noticed is a phenomenon that runs deeper than should be acceptable in Lebanese society. Have you ever seen a woman your grandmother’s age with her face so plasticized that she looks downright disgusting? I have seen way too many of those, the last one of them as I boarded my flight to France. Have you seen girls your age who decide the moment they finish high school to start injecting their lips and cheeks? Well, I know some girls like that.

And the list goes on.

No, I’m not saying everyone does it. I’m not saying all our women are plastic. I’m not saying all our women can be summed up with boobs and botox. What I’m saying is that we have a lot of them and what is “odd” is usually the thing that sticks out the most. Simplest example? We don’t notice the calm days we get throughout the year but when all hell breaks loose for a few days or weeks, we judge the entire year accordingly. And we get judged as an “unsafe” country by everyone else according to those days as well.

It’s the same premise when it comes to boobs, babes, botox and Beirut.

A friend of mine, whom I met abroad, has a Lebanese mother and a non-Lebanese father. She has a typical European face: blond, a little nose and green eyes. When she visited her mother’s homeland a while back, she got interrogated by random people on the streets who wanted to know the surgeon who fixed her nose – because no one can have a nose like that – and the place where she got her contact lenses – because no one can have eyes that green.

We have many people who want those little inconspicuous noses that don’t require them to choose a specific side every time them want to change their Facebook profile picture. We have many people who want bigger breasts and asses. We have many people who want to have chest implants to go off all macho. We have many people who want to change their faces, look younger and have bigger lips in the process.

Are those “many” people the entirety of the Lebanese population? No. Are those “many” also present in other societies? Perhaps. But if you look closely, you will find many even among your close friends who have at least had something done – the fact that we can get loans as well to do so isn’t helping. On the other hand, in a one month stay in Europe, I have failed to see as many botoxed babes here or women who dress up for a wedding every day before going to work.

Many in our societies in Lebanon like to show off. Be it through their phones, cars, clothes or even through plastic surgery. And those are the people we like to show the world because they are the ones who help us change the stereotypes others have of us. But with the baggage of the bling-bling crowds comes something else entirely, which is another stereotype: we are a country of fake people.

Are we fake? Absolutely not. Beirut has much more to offer than just that. Lebanon has way more to offer than rooftops and night clubs. But that idea won’t change anytime soon. Especially when the only thing we want people to see in Lebanon when they come here is Gemmayze, Skybar, Downtown and Zaitunay Bay. Demand of  our ministry of tourism to change tactics and to change the way it promotes the country  and then we get to be in uproar over an article turning our entire society plastic.

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9 thoughts on “Lebanon’s Twisted Perception of Beauty

  1. My problem with the article was that he pointed out that a lot of Lebanese women have plastic surgery but the generalizations (not just about Arabs) and the sexist nature of the writing. Also that it was quite clearly unresearched. I think that’s more of what people had a problem with.

    Reply
  2. i think plastic surgery is more widespread in lebanon than in other countries mainly because it’s about 20x cheaper. i lived in canada, spain, france and lebanon, and in all countries, girls were as disatissfied with their image and they seemed as wanting to get plastic surgery done. the only difference is it’s very possible in lebanon to get an occasional niptuck, with the help of a bank (or even without…).
    what really shocks me is the tendency for guys to get plastic surgery in lebanon! This clearly would be unmanly in other countries, whereas in the lebanese culture it is not.

    Reply
  3. Reblogged this on Ritachemaly's Blog and commented:
    Are we fake? Absolutely not. Beirut has much more to offer than just that. Lebanon has way more to offer than rooftops and night clubs. But that idea won’t change anytime soon. Especially when the only thing we want people to see in Lebanon when they come here is Gemmayze, Skybar, Downtown and Zaitunay Bay. Demand of our ministry of tourism to change tactics and to change the way it promotes the country and then we get to be in uproar over an article turning our entire society plastic.

    Reply
  4. Yeah, I think Lebanon has created a slightly distorted image of itself. Or, half of it is not really their own fault. Because whenever we get to see images from Lebanon, or Syria, or any other Arab country on our TV screens, we’ll see an angry man about to kill another man. If you image google “Lebanon” all you see is a whole bunch of images of Miss Lebanon. I mean, it’s really hard to research how life is in Lebanon from the internet.

    And I think that Lebanon’s beauty ideal is sort of twisted – for absolutely no reason. It’s already the country in the world with the highest concentration of beautiful women, so why bother chopping yourselves up under the knives?

    Well, my point is that blogging is important to create a real image of how it is to be in Lebanon, and I try to encourage as many people as possible to blog. There isn’t really a good blogging community here, and I think that needs to change. Ultimately is part of the battle of the freedom of expression, which I think Lebanon definitely needs to focus on preserving.

    That’s why I started inviting and encouraging people to blog on my blog 2famous.TV. It’s kind of working out for me, as I try to collect some Beirut experiences.

    Anyways, thanks for blogging! Keep it up!

    Jørgen

    Reply

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