Lebanon’s Phone Registration Procedure Needs To Be Rethought

My iPhone 5 fell in water almost a month ago. I didn’t know, so it sat in a puddle absorbing all the moisture it can get until its screen went bust.

We don’t have certified personnel for the iPhone in the country who can fix it and I’ll be sure they’re providing the best possible material. The man I took my iPhone to wanted to switch the screen to something that looked fishy, cost $200 and didn’t even work that well. He blamed my phone.

That same screen would cost about $300 in places around Beirut. So I decided to follow my instinct and send my phone to my family abroad for an out of warranty replacement, which is what happened.

The phone was brought into the country by an old man I barely knew and who had no idea he should register the phone at the airport. I figured it’s not a big deal, I’ll just take my passport the following day and head out to the nearest telecom center to get the procedure done.

That wasn’t possible. My passport didn’t work because I had been in Lebanon for more than a month since I traveled last. Obviously, dragging the 85 year old man who brought in the phone to one of those centers was out of the question. So what was I supposed to do to get my phone working on our networks?

I was lucky enough to know an exchange student who had been in the country for two weeks. So he did me a favor, fetched his passport and registered the phone for me. The process, advertised to be easy and seamless, took half a day and several car trips around Beirut just for something that should be second nature to anyone who gets a phone: the device getting reception. I have no clue what I would have done hadn’t the exchange student been available.

It is said these procedures are to prevent illegal smuggling of devices, provide another source of income for our government and basically make our life “easier” when it comes to phone purchases. But is that happening with phone prices taking a hike and the procedure having many parts of it that are apparently not thought out?

What if a relative sends you a gift from abroad with someone you don’t know at all and that person doesn’t register it. Are you supposed to take a trip to Syria just to get your passport stamped in order to get your phone to work?

I checked the online brochure the ministry posted back in May to see if there was a workaround on the matter. There was none. If you purchased a device online, you’d have a way to get it registered after paying the exorbitant taxes and using the customs’ receipt. But you’re basically out of luck in case you don’t have a recently stamped passport at your disposal.

Buying a phone and getting it to work by inserting a sim is apparently too simple for a country like this. But it’s all okay as long as we keep providing revenue for the government.

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5 thoughts on “Lebanon’s Phone Registration Procedure Needs To Be Rethought

  1. What? I also went to alfa to get the phone registered, but they didn’t care about my date of travel.

    Most of the people waiting with me worked in mobile stores, and registered the phones with their own passports (allowed up to three I think).

    Also, no one asked about my travels, they just looked at my passport number page, not looking at the stamps if I remember correctly.

    Reply
  2. This whole procedure is absurd. We pay exorbitant amount to purchase a phone and exorbitant bills and charge for a far from ideal network. Lebanon has a knack for making something simple difficult.

    Reply
  3. Pingback: The Lebanese Government Doesn’t Want You To Get iPhones | A Separate State of Mind | A Lebanese Blog

  4. Im lebanese visiting greece and I want to see if phones are cheaper here than lebanon, but
    Do I pay anything to register?
    How long exactly does it need? Half an hour? Half a day?
    Is it just signing a registration paper?

    Reply

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